You’ve Come a Long Way, Baby

50th Anniversary of the Surgeon General's Report on Smoking and Health

Yesterday marked the 50th anniversary of the landmark Surgeon General’s report on smoking and health. It really wasn’t that long ago that smoking was a way of life. As the author points out in this piece on why people smoke, even doctors had cigarettes in their mouth while examining patients back then. The Surgeon General himself, Dr. Luther Terry, was a smoker until a few months before he made his speech in 1964. And for something so deeply ingrained into the culture, so addictive, and a major part of the economy – the report was given on a Saturday in fear of a negative stock market response – we really have seen a remarkable decline in smoking.

The antismoking campaign is a major public health success with few parallels in the history of public health. It is being accomplished despite the addictive nature of tobacco and the powerful economic forces promoting its use.

–          CDC

We now have a better understanding how diffusely tobacco affects the body. People who smoke are at higher risk of everything we worry about getting: cancer, heart attack, stroke, vascular problems leading to leg amputation, and looking older. I see many adult children of smokers who have never smoked, deterred by their parents’ habit. But many children and young adults continue to experiment with smoking, often thinking that they can quit anytime. Unfortunately, smoking continues to be glorified in other settings. Hollywood practically gives them away, somewhat reminiscent of cigarettes being provided to US soldiers in the past.

We’ve come a long way, but we’ve got more work to do.

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It was a quiet year….

Two Thousand Thirteen was a quiet year for my blog. But it was a busy year of doctoring with 10-12 hours in clinic most days, an additional 2-3 at night, plus a few hours on most weekends. [We can analyze why over a drink sometime]. Of many sacrifices a full-time primary care practice necessitates, blogging was one of them. Also falling victim to the work schedule were guitar lessons, dinners with friends, and medical conferences I had planned to attend. Reading? Shopping? All of those seemed like luxuries. I missed writing on this blog, which was a nice way for me to reflect on this complex world of medicine.

However, in 2013, I did continue to work out regularly (for my own sanity, and – yes – I think of this as an achievement considering my schedule) and I wrote regularly for the Seattle Times as a columnist for the On Health section of the paper. I continued my position as a committee member with the Women in Medicine group of the Washington Chapter of American College of Physicians, and we hosted various increasingly successful events during the year. I continued to serve as an advisory board member for an IT company, learning more about the complexities of IT systems, networking, and EHRs. I mostly listened on Twitter, often inspired to write posts, but lacked the time and energy to put my best work into it. However, it was wonderful to keep up with some of writing of some of the colleagues I admire. And the best part of 2013 was that I had the honor of having one of my pieces published in a book (more on that in a future post).

We are fully into 2014 and New Years’ Day already feels like it was long ago. My schedule has not changed, but there is one thing I know for sure – this year won’t be so quiet for my blog.