The Hashtag That Resonates Reverberates

Over the past week, the #WorkMeHomeMe hashtag has been making some rounds on Twitter. 

It started with a couple tweets, an opinion, and then a call to action.

The Work-Me-Home-Me hashtag has awoken the self-deprecating side of MedTwitter. Unlike the oft carefully crafted and curated world of Facebook (as I remember it), Twitterites are juxtaposing their strong professional capabilities right alongside their…well… less stellar sides. Most – but not all – are MDs and women. Others want to play. 

And they should.

They should because the candid and public sharing of a seemingly contradictory combination behaviors demonstrates awareness that life can sometimes seem dichotomous. It helps us verbalize that we do not “keep our sh*t together” 100% of the time. More importantly, it demonstrates that we accept this as part of reality. Enough so, at least, that we can admit it to each other.

It can be validating just to read through these tweets. 

And apparently useful in educating one’s spouse of the Work-Me-Home-Me phenomenon:

The humor has the potential to lighten your mood:

And it can be sobering:

#WorkMeHomeMe tweets represent the honest reality of the work-life conversation, the work-life balance/juggle/symmetry/dichotomy/contradiction/harmony/whatever-else-we-may-call-it. Getting these raw glimpses into the lives of healthcare workers (and other professions) may be particularly valuable for so many who are starting their careers and already feeling stressed about how to be successful and perfect in all facets of life.

As empowering as #ILookLikeASurgeon – one of my favorite Twitter hashtags – is, #WorkMeHomeMe is the flipside, saying #IAlsoLookLikeThisAndItsOK.

And that can be empowering in a very different way.  

 

 

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