It was a quiet year….

Two Thousand Thirteen was a quiet year for my blog. But it was a busy year of doctoring with 10-12 hours in clinic most days, an additional 2-3 at night, plus a few hours on most weekends. [We can analyze why over a drink sometime]. Of many sacrifices a full-time primary care practice necessitates, blogging was one of them. Also falling victim to the work schedule were guitar lessons, dinners with friends, and medical conferences I had planned to attend. Reading? Shopping? All of those seemed like luxuries. I missed writing on this blog, which was a nice way for me to reflect on this complex world of medicine.

However, in 2013, I did continue to work out regularly (for my own sanity, and – yes – I think of this as an achievement considering my schedule) and I wrote regularly for the Seattle Times as a columnist for the On Health section of the paper. I continued my position as a committee member with the Women in Medicine group of the Washington Chapter of American College of Physicians, and we hosted various increasingly successful events during the year. I continued to serve as an advisory board member for an IT company, learning more about the complexities of IT systems, networking, and EHRs. I mostly listened on Twitter, often inspired to write posts, but lacked the time and energy to put my best work into it. However, it was wonderful to keep up with some of writing of some of the colleagues I admire. And the best part of 2013 was that I had the honor of having one of my pieces published in a book (more on that in a future post).

We are fully into 2014 and New Years’ Day already feels like it was long ago. My schedule has not changed, but there is one thing I know for sure – this year won’t be so quiet for my blog.

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Social Media Adoption by Physicians. It’s A Little Like Quitting Smoking

Today, Mark Britton, CEO of Avvo (a physician rating site that also provides answers to health questions), gave a presentation to our clinic regarding the role of social media in healthcare. He gave an excellent background on the evolution of social media, as well as general principles to consider when embarking on this path.

 “If you don’t have a meaningful web presence, you don’t exist.”

This quote, from Britton, is poignant and true – true, at least, to the many doctors already utilizing social media. But many doctors feel the opposite is true. They might say, “When I take care of patients, make phone calls, am physically present and working tirelessly in clinic or the operating room… that is when I exist. Social media is a fad for kids and I really don’t have the time for it.” This is the oft-referenced head-in-sand approach – never a good one. Others might feel that social media in healthcare is ALL about marketing and self-promotion. (By the way, the vast majority of physicians do the latter poorly, quite frankly. This is usually due to a fear of the impression it would make on others. In fact, for years, I deliberately did not reveal my profession to many non-healthcare acquaintances I encountered unless specifically asked. ) Some doctors feel their years of experience and employer reputation – rather than fancy web pages – should be enough to convince patient that they are good doctors.

All of these are valid concerns and points. As I have now been blogging, tweeting, and using LinkedIn and Facebook since November of 2010, I almost forgot that I was a nay-sayer once, too. It occurred to me today, as I observed the faces in the room during this social media talk, that educating physicians about social media adoption is akin to smoking cessation counseling for patients. That is to say, one will encounter differing levels of interest depending on which doctors you meet.

PRECONTEMPLATIVE STAGE

Typical response involves using the word Twitter with a sneer or not even recognizing it.  “I don’t do Facebook. I don’t do Twitter.” Doctors in this stage might also wonder, “Why would I change the way I practice now? I have plenty of patients. I don’t have time for this.”

CONTEMPLATIVE STAGE

An individual in this stage might be someone who already uses Facebook for personal reasons (keeping up with family, using Facebook as a photo album,  etc). He may be curious about how social media can work for him. Some doctors in this stage might want to get involved but are afraid of the time commitment. After all, EHR adoption and meaningful use requirements are eating up more of the limited time that is not spent in direct patient care.

PREPARATION

In this stage, the doctors are ready and researching tools. They might be observing the behavior of other social-media-savvy doctors. They might get inspiration or ideas from some of the physician bloggers/tweeps that I follow most frequently: SeattleMamaDoc, 33 charts, Dr. Wes, John MD , KevinMD, Clinical Cases and Images: Casesblog and – ahem- my own blog.

ACTION

Here, doctors are committed and are actively embarking on the social media path.

MAINTENANCE

This is tricky because social media CAN be consuming and it is easy to get frustrated (especially if you are only looking to increase revenue quickly).  It is doable, however,  and takes a little discipline – doctors are good at that, right? – to get just the right balance so that you don’t lose steam. It helps if you receive input on topics that you find interesting and relevant.

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I was thrilled to see the number of physicians from my clinic attend the presentation. I underestimated the level of interest in the topic. Ultimately, no one should feel pressured into social media for the sake of social media itself or for the sake of generating quick revenue. One thing is true with social media; motives are more apparent than we would like to think.

If a doctor is passionate about his/her work in the healthcare industry, the realm of social media is one that cannot be ignored. To expand on Mark Britton’s words, not only do you not exist if you don’t have a meaningful web presence, you might even have an inaccurate and less than favorable existence, a web portrait painted by reviews on Yelp or Angie’s List or Healthgrades and generated from very limited interactions or experience. This might come as a shock to even the most experienced and well-meaning doctor.

Furthermore – and most important, in my opinion – patients get their information from the internet. If more reputable and qualified physicians are not there to direct them, someone else – even a celebrity without any medical training– will be more than happy to “educate” them.

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